Page 1 of 212

PowerPoint on the Ideal Classroom Environment

The Ideal Classroom Environment to Maximize Learning for All Students

Description: My PowerPoint on the ideal classroom environment for education psychology class.

By Richard X. Thripp
April 26, 2011
EDP 2002 Prof. John Connor
Daytona State College

On SlideShare.net and embedded below.

* * * * * * * * * *

Tags: classroom layout, procedures, educational philosophy, behavior management, learning environment, competition, cooperation

Local download links:
http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/20110426-ideal-classroom.pdf (1.0MB)
http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/20110426-ideal-classroom.pptx (1.0MB)

I, Richard X. Thripp, hereby release this presentation and all associated metadata under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License license.

PowerPoint on China

A Selection of Landmarks and Geography of China and Nearby Countries

Description: 11-slide presentation on the Great Wall of China, geography, religions, a few landmarks, Taiwan, Beijing, elephant safari, the Petronas Towers, Teresa Teng.

By Richard X. Thripp
April 19, 2011
EME 2040 Prof. John Connor
Daytona State College

On SlideShare.net and embedded below.

* * * * * * * * * *

Tags: china, geography, taiwan, great wall, petronas towers, buddhism, beijing, safari, elephants

Local download links:
http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/20110419-eme2040-cai.pdf (2.2MB)
http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/20110419-eme2040-cai.pptx (2.2MB)

I, Richard X. Thripp, hereby release this presentation and all associated metadata under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License license.

PowerPoint on Multiple Intelligences

An Analysis of the Educational Impact of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences

By Richard X. Thripp
April 16, 2011
EDF 1005 Prof. John Connor
Daytona State College

* * * * *

On SlideShare.net and embedded below.

* * * * * * * * * *

Tags: education, gardner, multiple intelligences

Local download links:
http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/20110416-edf1005-cai.pdf (1.4MB)
http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/20110416-edf1005-cai.pptx (4.2MB)

I, Richard X. Thripp, hereby release this presentation and all associated metadata under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License license.

PowerPoint on Psycho-Educational Thinkers

The Educational Contributions of Jean Piaget, Howard Gardner, B.F. Skinner, and Albert Bandura

By Richard X. Thripp
April 12, 2011
EDP 2002 Prof. John Connor
Daytona State College

* * * * *

On SlideShare.net and embedded below.

* * * * * * * * * *

Tags: accommodation, assimilation, bandura, gardner, multiple intelligences, piaget, psychological constructivism, skinner, reinforcement, self-efficacy

Local download links:
http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/20110412-psycho-edu-thinkers.pdf (0.6MB)
http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/20110412-psycho-edu-thinkers.pptx (1.1MB)

I, Richard X. Thripp, hereby release this presentation and all associated metadata under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License license.

An Analysis of the Culture of India [Essay]

An Analysis of the Culture of India

Richard X. Thripp

Daytona State College

For Dr. Natalie D. Rooney

EDF 2085 Introduction to Diversity for Educators

Culture Paper, 15%

Sunday, 2011 February 6

Final First Draft


Abstract

The culture of India is very unique and goes back thousands of years. In this essay, I will focus only on modern India, particularly on Mohandus K. Gandhi’s influence on the formation of the 20th century Indian government and culture, but also on religion and language. However, I will be ignoring movies, music, and postsecondary education.

Additionally, I will list major American institutions, advice for Indian American parents and children immigrating to the United States, academic citations, and personal commentary.

Finally, I will include a lot of relevant metrics, subjective summarizations, and statistics.

Note: I did not use proper A.P.A. style or proper citations in this paper.


India has both a rich cultural history spanning multiple millenniums, and is the 2nd most populated country on earth with a population of 1,155 million (C1), trailing China’s population of 1,331 million but leading the 3rd most populated country on earth by a whopping 275% — the United States, which has 308 million people. (All statistics as of 2009.)

However, many people in India are very poor and under-nourished, lacking proper food, water, shelter, infrastructure, education, and job opportunities. Despite this, many world leaders and scientists hail from India, and extrapolating the previous 90 years over the remaining 90 years of the 21st century, it is safe to say that India and China will surpass the United States in planetary dominance. The Indian people are some of the most hard-working and resolved people in the world, much like the Americans were in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

On 1869 October 2, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born in Porbander in modern-day Gujarat, where his father served in the Indian government under the rule of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (now the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland as of 1927 and commonly known as the U.K.), of which the Indian portion was called the British Indian Empire (commonly known as the British Raj). Gandhi married at 13, had a son at 19, and left for London to pursue a law degree several months later. After enrolling in the High Court of London in 1891, he dropped out and went back to India. (www.sscnet.ucla.edu)

After failing his law practice, Gandhi spent 22 years in South Africa, where he declared himself a seeker of truth attained by love and celibacy. He also invented the term satyagraha to mean non-violent resistance, and he wrote a short treatise called “Indian Home Rule” subtly denouncing the United Kingdom, industrialization, and contemporary technology in general.

Gandhi’s first political campaign in India spanned 1915 to 1922, when he earned the title of Mahatma meaning “Great Soul” for initiating a movement of peaceful, non-violent, non-cooperation with the British government, which wielded great power but inferior numbers. When a large crowd killed many Indian policemen at Chauri Chaura in the United Provinces in February of 1922, Gandhi was arrested, convicted of sedition, and sentenced to six years by the British Raj, despite delivering a powerful self-defense and indictment of Great Britain at his trial.

Gandhi was released three years early due to poor health, after fasting three weeks in 1924 to stop Hindu-Muslim riots at Kohat. In 1932, he began his Fast unto Death to destroy the caste system which prevented people of the untouchable caste from marrying, doing business with, or associating with anyone outside their caste, and vice-versa. He also wanted the government to do away with separate electorates for the untouchables and the other castes, which angered Ambedkar, the leader of the untouchables.

Before surviving his fast, Gandhi broke the salt laws in 1930, by marching to the sea with his followers from March 12 to April 5, and, upon completing the 240 mile march to Dandi, collecting natural salt from the Arabian Sea as a symbolic act of resistance to the British Raj—specifically, the British monopoly on the production and sale of salt. Britain arrested Gandhi and thousands of other Indians, but it was at this point that the government relented and agreed to hold a Round Table Conference in London with Gandhi to discuss liberating India. The negotiations led nowhere, and upon Gandhi’s return to India, he was arrested again.

Prior to the Salt Satyagraha, the Indian National Congress further angered Great Britain by raising their saffron-white-green tricolor flag and issuing the following Purna Swaraj (Declaration of Independence) at midnight on 1929 December 31:

We believe that it is the inalienable right of the Indian people, as of any other people, to have freedom and to enjoy the fruits of their toil and have the necessities of life, so that they may have full opportunities of growth. We believe also that if any government deprives a people of these rights and oppresses them the people have a further right to alter it or abolish it. The British government in India has not only deprived the Indian people of their freedom but has based itself on the exploitation of the masses, and has ruined India economically, politically, culturally and spiritually. We believe therefore, that India must sever the British connection and attain Purna Swaraj or complete independence.”

In his mid-60s in the mid-1930s, Gandhi established homestead in a remote village called Segaon (now Sevagram) with no power or water in the very center of India, refusing to return to Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad under a non-sovereign India. When Nazi Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Great Britain wanted to drag India into the war, but Gandhi correctly identified the hypocrisy in the U.K. claiming to fight a war for democracy while attempting to maintain dictatorial control over India. It was at this point that he launched his “Do or Die” and “Quit India” campaigns, the former being a message to the Indian people and the latter being a message to the British Empire, which ultimately succeeded with the Indian Independence Act of 1947, effective 1947 August 15. However, Gandhi considered himself a Hindu, Muslim, and Christian, not considering divergent religions to be mutually exclusive and wanting India to remain unpartitioned. This did not succeed, and India was divided into the sovereign states of the Dominion of Pakistan on 1947 August 14 (now Pakistan and Bangladesh) and the secular Union of India on 1947 August 15 (now the Republic of India), mainly to separate the Muslims from the Hindus and Sikhs. Immediately following the partition, 7.226 million Muslims fled India into Pakistan and 7.249 Hindus and Sikhs fled Pakistan into India to avoid being religious minorities.

While there have been many skirmishes fought between India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Burma (now known as Myanmar and in perpetual martial law since 1962), there can be no doubt that Mahatma Gandhi had a major influence on the liberation of India and was overall a positive force in the world and one of the principle contributors to modern Indian culture. His writing, newspapers, philosophy, demonstrations, and particularly his autobiography, The Story of My Experiments with Truth, and his quote, “be the change you want to see in the world” will be remembered for centuries to come.

The Volusia County statistics on FedStats only include Whites, Blacks, American Indian and Alaska Natives, Asians, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders, and Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin. There are no statistics for Indian Americans. The U.S. Census Bureau reported on July 1, 1999 that the State of Florida contains an estimated 60,358 people of American Indian and Alaska Native origin, but it is unclear if this includes Indian Americans. Both the United States and Florida governments provide no information with regard to Indian Americans, because they recognize only the aforementioned six races. Notably, searching Google for “Indian American” without quotation marks returns only results regarding American Indians (Native Americans) on the first page. However, the Embassy of India in Washington, D.C. considers a Non-resident Indian (NRI) or Person of Indian Origin (PIO) to be anyone who has left India up to four generations removed. The Embassy says there are over 24 million such people, with 2,765,815 residing in the United States as of 2008.

A child immigrating from India would have to learn the English language and place a lesser focus on academics and memorization to thrive in the typical, interdisciplinary American classroom which includes recess, physical education, fewer students, mathematical calculators, and more artistic and creative assignments. While Indians and Asians are known for their strong work ethic and high intellectual intelligence, they may lack the emotional intelligence of their American peers. However, as with any skill, this can be learned or compensated for.

To accommodate Indian Americans, principals should hire more teachers who know Hindi, Bengali, Telugu, Marathi, Tamil, Urdu, Gujarati, Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya, Punjabi, and other widely-spoken Indian languages. Similarly, the federal or state governments should provide grants or matching funds to purchase computerized translation devices or hire interpreters for Indian American students. At the same time, Indian American parents should make a concerted effort to learn American English fluently so they can communicate multi-linguistically with their children.

Finally, Indian Americans should be educated about United States heritage and history including the Constitution, our founding fathers, the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, our conquest of the central North American continent, Alaska, Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, the atomic bomb, the September 11th attacks, the presidents, executive orders, the Supreme Court, Congress, the IRS, CIA, FBI, DHS, and TSA, state sovereignty, federal holidays, the U.S. Postal Service, baseball, apple pie, Puritanism, Protestantism and Catholicism as contrasted with Hinduism, Islam, and other religions in India, our relationship with Israel, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Canada, the United Kingdom, OPEC, the European Union, and other governments, our status as a global economic and military power, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon, the Federal Reserve System, Harvard University, New York City, San Fransisco, Atlanta, Daytona Beach, the de-industrialization of the United States in the late 20th century, our dependence on China, and our contributions to all major fields of study including, but not limited to, the arts, music, sciences, medicine, pharmacology, military science, political science, and environmentalism. Particularly with the rise of not only the Internet, cell phones, Google, and Facebook, we live in a global, virtually interconnected world which facilitates the bidirectional sharing of information between nations, institutions, and individuals in multiple formats on a historically unprecedented scale.


Citations

C1: Population of India: 1,155,347,678 as of 2009 according to the World Bank’s Book of World Development Indicators.

C2: Volusia County MapStats from FedStats: http://www.fedstats.gov/qf/states/12/12127.html

C3: Paragraph 7 of the Citizenship Amendment Act of 2003: http://www.indianembassy.org/consular/Overseas_Citizen/para7.htm

C4: 2000 U.S. Census: States Ranked by American Indian and Alaska Native Population, July 1, 1999: http://www.census.gov/population/estimates/state/rank/aiea.txt

C5: The Constitution of India, Revised 2008 July 29: http://lawmin.nic.in/coi/coiason29july08.pdf


References

http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/southasia/History/Gandhi/gandhi.html

http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1998/3/98.03.05.x.html

http://www.unc.edu/~mumukshu/gandhi/

http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/kingweb/about_king/encyclopedia/gandhi.htm

http://www.acm.edu/programs/5/india/index.html

http://www.irc.caltech.edu/p-281-business-with-india.aspx

http://web1.johnshopkins.edu/aidjhu/?p=94


Forward:

I decided to write my cultural paper about the people and government of India, including Indian Americans and with a major focus on the contributions of Mohandas Gandhi to Indian and global culture, independence, and philosophy. I haven’t learned APA style and I didn’t rewrite my essay or use citations, nor did I start it until 8pm before it was due, but I think it’s pretty good that I wrote a 2000 word essay in under 3 hours that doesn’t feel like (in my opinion), a bore to read.

You can find the full text of my paper here: http://daytonastate.org/files/edu/culture-20110205-india-thrippr.pdf

I think it’s very important for even elementary school teachers to have broad-spectrum knowledge of every major discipline, language, people, and culture, even if they never achieve mastery in any of them. Only then can they seamlessly flow from one topic to the next and present a complete picture of the world to their students in a way that is fascinating and inoffensive.

Fall 2010 Award Disbursement

Daytona State College began disbursing scholarship refunds to the debit cards of college students yesterday, Sept. 24, 2010. If you don’t receive yours in the next two weeks, make sure to contact the office of student accounts.

Even students without scholarship or academic merit can receive a refund. The federal Pell provides most students with $694 per 3-credit class, and with Daytona State’s tuition costing $375 per class or less, this will result in windfalls of hundreds or thousands of dollars per semester for many students.

For a program that is completely unconstitutional, the Pell grant consumes a large portion of the Federal budget. While it cost a mere $16 billion dollars in 2008-2009, for the 2009-2010 school year the cost was $25.4 billion, and thanks to Obama, it is projected to cost $27.5 billion this fiscal year, granting an average of $3000 to over 8 million students. This wealth redistribution scheme is great news for students but bad news for job-seekers and the economy (an AA degree is becoming as common as dirt).

Note that if one of your parents died serving in Iraq or Afghanistan, you should receive a $2750 Pell grant this semester and next regardless of your eligibility or course load. Even though you are grieving, make sure you get your deserved award. If both your parents died in the line of duty, ask for even more money.

Supplemental Instruction for Survey of Biology

As of Tue., Sept. 22 I am the Supplemental Instruction Leader (SI Leader) for Dr. Backer’s course, Survey of Biological Sciences (BSC1005) at bldg. 410 at Daytona State College. This is a job, so I’m now an employee of Daytona State College. :grin:

I’ve created a webpage for the SI sessions on this website, including the session times. Attendance at this week’s Tue./Wed./Thu. sessions was 3/8/10 respectively. For sec. 3 there is an SI before the exam Tue., Sept. 29. Read all about it here: http://daytonastate.org/biology.

I lead three sessions weekly through December 2009. Come to any:
Tue., 11 AM – 12 PM, bldg. 410, rm. 228.
Wed., 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM, bldg. 410, rm. 228.
Thu., 2 PM – 3 PM, bldg. 410, rm. 131

Though it’s only a part-time work/study job, I’m glad to be a part of the Daytona State College team!

How to Survive in QUANTA

QUANTA is Daytona State College’s premier learning community. It is interdisciplinary, meaning it merges multiple subjects into a cohesive framework. Instead of taking three courses in separate buildings with different professors and students, you get to stay with the same students and professors through six courses taught over two semesters.

I was in QUANTA 24 in the 2007-2008 school year, and I can tell you it is a hard set of courses. A lot is expected of you. You must have above-average ACT, SAT, or CPT scores to qualify. You are expected to have a firm grasp of history and the rules of English, and you will write over 20,000 words if you stay through both semesters. You must develop good habits and study techniques. You must manage your time well. Though QUANTA is based on creativity and flexibility, all your essays must make solid arguments citing other academic works. You must follow formal grammar and citation rules. This is a point-by-point guide to surviving in QUANTA.

Basics

How does QUANTA work? In the fall semester, it consists of English I by Professor Frank Gunshanan, Humanities I by Dr. Casey Blanton, and Introduction to Sociology by Dr. Michael Flota. Students who continue into the spring will learn English II, Humanities II, and American Political & Economic Issues from the same professors. Both semesters follow the same format but the spring semester is heavier. Though more advanced, we get more of the same from Frank and Casey in the spring, while Flota takes off with his analysis of the world economy, banking, and the evolution of American politics. I imagine his course will be even more interesting this year, what with the Obama administration, socialized health care, and the raiding of the U.S. treasury.

Continue reading

How to Log In to Florida Online at Daytona State College

MVSmith asked this question over in the Daytona State College forum:

Virtual College

Where did it go?

I’m signed up for Sociology via online with the VC and not only have I not yet heard from the professor, but the links I have to the VC no longer work. On top of that, I’ve been searching the new site for DSC and there’s nothing there (that I’ve found anyways).

So, if we have a class online, how do we get to it?

It’s a good question. The new virtual college is confusing. My Physics professor, Dr. Gajendra Tulsian, asked a student to log in to his account on Monday for a demonstration. He didn’t know how, the next student didn’t either, and the system wasn’t even working for the last one. Barring problems on the college’s end, here’s the reply I wrote detailing the steps:

They do make it confusing, I know. Here’s what to do:

1. Go to class.daytonastate.edu.
2. Enter your user name as first initial, last name, last three digits of student ID. Mine is rthripp658, for example.
3. Enter your password. I think this is your Falconmail password. Use the Forgot Password link if you need to, and the system will email your password to your Falconmail account.

And to log in to your Falconnet account, click the “Falconnet” button at the top of the daytonastate.edu home page, log-in with your Student ID and password as birth date (081791, for example), click the big “Check Email” button toward the top-right, click “Continue…”, and finally, click “Inbox.” Too many steps, I know.

Once you’re in at class.daytonastate.edu, there are even more steps. Under “My Courses,” you may have to click the little plus sign to the right of “FA08″ (for Fall 2008) to get your course list to appear. Then, click the course you want to go to in the list. Then you’re at the course home page, where everything happens. There should be links at the top-left, below the college logo, which may say “Content Discussions Links Quizzes” (it varies by course). “Content” is where all the class material will be; mandatory reading, study guides, etc. Discussions are private, online forums for the class students. Participation is often mandatory; check the home page or Content pages to find out. “Links” are just links to other online resources. “Quizzes” aren’t just quizzes; they’re where you’ll be taking all your full-blown exams.

Good luck with your course, and let me know if you need help with anything else. Check out my article, How to Ace a Daytona State Online Exam; I’ve written some good tips there.

Page 1 of 212